Book Review: The Little Tea Shop Of Lost And Found, by Trisha Ashley

Have I ever mentioned to you, my lovely readers, that I quite like Trisha Ashley books? I wasn’t entirely sure if I had, so I thought I had probably better write another review for you, just in case you were interested… (You can find the other two here Book Review: The Christmas Invitation by Trisha Ashley and here Book Review: Chocolate Shoes and Wedding Blues by Trisha Ashley )

This book is far more fantastical than the previous two I have written about, with the main character, foundling Alice Rose, writing dark fantasy alongside setting up a high end tea shop, alongside her search for her birth-mother. Little snippits of this dark fantasy are sprinkled throughout the book, with quirky insights into Alice’s mind.

The book starts each chapter with a couple of paragraphs from an unnamed woman describing life in the village of Haworth both now and when Alice was found as a baby. As Alice gets closer to the truth of her discovery the unnamed woman gives more and more insight into what really happened back then, and we start to get a glimpse of where Alice may have come from. It is an intruiging and tantalising tactic on the authors part, and it absolutely worked – I was hooked.

As mentioned in the blurb above, Alice has moved back to the village where she was found in order to try to find her family, but also to set up a high-end tea shop, having spent much of her adult life running cafe’s. After a terrible tragedy she buys the cafe unseen and arrives to all of the expected drama’s that such impulse purchases tend to produce. She shows real sass and backbone in pulling herself up from her dark despair and starting to piece together a life that she can see herself living, assisted by the adorable family of her hunky neighbour.

Alice investigates, explores, builds and of course bakes her way through the book in an endearing and at times almost blissful manner that one comes to expect from Trisha Ashleys characters. A main character who is running a cafe is almost guarenteed to dwell enticingly on the sweet details of baking, and the book does not disappoint. It is a warm, soul-warming little number that I love to read curled up under a blanket, preferably with a slice of cake in one hand and a hot drink in the other.

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Published by BeckyBookBlog

My name is Becky and I run a blog about Books

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